The more I think and read about the session fixation issue (see the official announcement here and additional info there) that has been discovered in OAuth, the more I’m convinced of the benefits Identity Federation brings to the table.

Think about it, the main issue (beside securing the callback URL which is reasonably easy to achieve) is the fact that the (service) Consumer and the Service Provider can’t currently be sure that the user that has initiated the OAuth flow (and thus has logged in at the Consumer site) is the same user that logs in the Service Provider during the authorization process. If something akin to SAML‘s SSO model were in play (where identities of the principal at the consumer & SP site are federated in a privacy-preserving manner – meaning no correlation issue) then ensuring it is the same user would be a no brainer.

This also can be looked at from the token perspective and what information it conveys. Wouldn’t a SAML assertion be useful here?

Another interesting path would be to use something like Liberty’s Interaction Service to obtain confirmation from the user thus thwarting an attacker to obtain the access token in your name.

As mentioned before, I’m one of the coauthors for an article that is to be published in the proceedings of Financial Cryptography and Data Security 2009. The article is available here:

Any comment is more than welcome of course!

 

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